Boise Cascade site could get apartments

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Monday, November 19, 2012

The vacant Boise Cascade site in downtown Salem could become a 120-unit apartment project on Salem's waterfront.

At a meeting with city staff on Thursday, representatives of MWIC Pringle Corp. discussed building on about 4 acres south of Salem’s Riverfront Carousel and north of Pringle Creek. MWIC is affiliated with Larry Tokarski, a Salem developer who has an ownership stake in the Boise site.

“There is a demand for multifamily — a huge demand,” [MWIC attorney Mark] Shipman said of the project’s timing.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}boise cascade{/biztweet}

 

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