OSU engineers develop tiny chip

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Monday, November 19, 2012

Oregon State University engineers have developed technology that can monitor vital signs with tiny sensors that cost less than 25 cents.

In collaboration with private industry, they expect to move the sensor-packed microchip, the size and thickness of a postage stamp, into the consumer marketplace, perhaps by mid 2013.

"We can now make important biomedical measurements more portable, routine, convenient and affordable than ever before," says Patrick Chiang, associate professor in OSU's School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science.

The sensors are non-invasive. They'll be able to stick on the skin to monitor anything from atrial fibrillation in heart patients to brain signals in those with dementia to physical activity in those trying to lose weight.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}osu chip{/biztweet}

 

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