Willamette Queen's fate uncertain

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Monday, November 19, 2012

The Willamette Queen in Salem is due to be inspected by the U.S. Coast Guard in Salem by Dec. 31, but can't make it there as the Willamette Falls Locks in Oregon City are not working.

The sternwheeler is an icon on Salem’s portion of the Willamette River and can often be found docked at Riverfront Park downtown. It offers a variety of river cruises that include sightseeing, lunch and dinner, and it can be reserved for events such as weddings.

In 2011, the Army Corps of Engineers classified the Willamette Falls Locks as non-operational because of corrosion of the anchors that hold the gates in place.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

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