Solarize losing appeal

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Friday, November 16, 2012

Many initial participants of Oregon's Solarize movement wonder whether the business model has reached the point of diminishing returns.

Decreased solar-energy prices, attractive rebates and increased marketing savvy have combined to offset much of the movement’s innate appeal.

“In Portland, Solarize has kind of run its course,” said Lee Rahr, a former city staffer who contributed to the Solarize Guidebook, a community guide to the collective purchasing of residential solar electric systems.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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