Harbor Oil Superfund not contaminated enough for cleanup

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Friday, November 16, 2012

The Environmental Protection Agency proposes not cleaning up Portland's Harbor Oil property that became a federal Superfund cleanup site nine years ago.

The property, fouled by a former waste-oil recycler, hosts a familiar stew of toxic industrial chemicals, from the pesticide DDT to polychlorinated biphenyls. PCBs, a former industrial insulator and probable carcinogen, are also the main villain at the city's far larger Superfund site, Portland Harbor.

But the legacy pollution at the North Portland site isn't high enough -- and the contaminated fish in nearby Force Lake aren't numerous enough -- to warrant further work, said Christopher Cora, EPA project manager.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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