Home Must Reads Columbia River bridge design is too low

Columbia River bridge design is too low

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Thursday, November 15, 2012

CRC officials say they are trying to fix one of the most embarrassing problems with the troubled $3.5 billion Interstate 5 project: The freeway bridges as now designed aren’t high enough to accommodate some Columbia River ships.

The project went ahead with designs for spans with 95-foot clearances despite warnings from the U.S. Coast Guard the bridges needed to be higher to handle anticipated river traffic.

CRC officials have since told state lawmakers and the public they want to address the Coast Guard’s concerns by building higher spans with clearances of up to 110 feet.

But records obtained by WW show that 110 feet is still too low to satisfy the Coast Guard. And CRC officials—rather than work to redesign the bridges—are trying to get river users to change their practices. In one case, they’re hoping two tall-masted ships that routinely sail on the Columbia will dismantle their masts before going under the too-low bridges.

Read more in today's Willamette Week.

 

More Articles

Growing a mobility cluster

News
Friday, October 31, 2014
0414 bikes bd2f6052BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Why are there so few transportation startups in Portland?  The city’s leadership in bike, transit and pedestrian transportation has been well-documented.  But that was then — when government and nonprofits paved the way for a new, less auto centric way of life.


Read more...

100 Best Nonprofits announced

News
Thursday, October 02, 2014

100NP14logo4WebOregon Business magazine has named the sixth annual 100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon.


Read more...

Constant Contact

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

To prevent burnout, companies are banning email and after-hours communications. But is the 24-hour workday here to stay?


Read more...

Woman of Steel

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Tamara Lundgren tackles the challenges—without getting trampled.


Read more...

What I'm Reading

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

Nick Herinckx, CEO of Obility, and Jake Weatherly, CEO of SheerID, share what they've been reading.


Read more...

Innovation: a critique

News
Wednesday, October 08, 2014
1008 innovation thumbBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

A Design Week panel discussion raises questions about how innovative we really are.


Read more...

Kill the Meeting

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Meetings get a bad rap. A few local companies make them count.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS