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Portland plans to remake its taxi industry

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Must Reads
Thursday, November 15, 2012

Portland has never been a taxi city. Streetcars, bikes and light rail have captured our interest much more than the idea of being able to run curbside, hold out a hand and flag down a crosstown ride on the spot.

Portland taxi drivers will attest to the “poor relations” attitude toward taxis in the Rose City. A study commissioned by the city this year revealed that taxi drivers on average make $6.22 an hour, well below the state’s $8.80 an hour minimum wage.

Mayor Sam Adams would like to see that change. He is supporting a sweeping set of proposals intended to remake the taxi industry in Portland. The proposals were presented to the City Council Nov. 7.

Read more in today's Portland Tribune.


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