Home Must Reads Brownfield redevelopment could boost economy

Brownfield redevelopment could boost economy

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Thursday, November 08, 2012

More brownfield redevelopment like in Portland's South Waterfront could boost the economy and provide needed housing, a Metro report says.

The Regional Brownfield Scoping Project estimates there may be as many as 2,300 properties in the region that are potentially contaminated and either vacant or underutilized. This represents about 7 percent of all commercial, mixed use and industrial zoned lands within the urban growth boundary administered by Metro.

According to the report, under land-use regulations, redevelopment of the entire inventory could yield up to 71 million square feet of new development, including 138,000 new dwelling units and work space for about 69,000 more jobs, generating nearly $1.4 billion in additional wages and as much as $427 million in new property tax revenue.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

{biztweet}brownfield{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Water World

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Fred Ziari aims to feed the global population.


Read more...

The Backstory

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

In our cover story this month, Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, discuss their rapidly growing businesses and Portland’s red hot food scene. The conversation provides an interesting lens through which to explore trends in the grocery store and restaurant sectors.


Read more...

Downtime

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Bob Dethlefs, CEO of Evanta, balances work and play.


Read more...

The clean fuels opportunity

News
Monday, November 10, 2014
111014-dirtyfuel-thumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A market for low-carbon transportation fuels has a chance to flourish in Oregon if regulators adopt the second phase of the state’s Clean Fuels Program.


Read more...

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

Shifting Ground

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Bans on genetically modified crops create uncertainty for farmers.


Read more...

Shuffling the Deck

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JON BELL

Oregon tribes still bet on casinos.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS