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Homeownership nonprofits merging

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Monday, October 29, 2012

A Portland homeownership nonprofit and a similar nonprofit serving Clackamas County are merging.

Portland-based Proud Ground and Clackamas Community Land Trust agreed to join forces under the Proud Ground name. The organization will remain in Portland and add three new board members from newly served regions.

Both organizations subsidize the cost of buying a house, in most cases by selling the home while keeping ownership of the land it sits on. They focus on first-time buyers who qualify for a mortgage but are otherwise priced out of the Portland market.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}proud ground{/biztweet}

 

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