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Chirpify brings social commerce to Instagram

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Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Portland startup Chirpify expanded its service of enabling financial transactions from Twitter to Instagram.

Web surfers must first link their Instagram and PayPal accounts; once that's done, they can make a purchase or donation by typing "buy" or "donate."

Chirpify raised $1.3 million last spring to help expand its service, which has become popular among technophiles and music fans. Independent artists and even some big-name acts -- including Green Day -- offer song and album downloads via Twitter, using Chirpify's technology.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}chirpify{/biztweet}

 

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