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Heating costs to rise

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Must Reads
Thursday, October 11, 2012

Americans will pay more to heat their homes this winter.

Fuel prices will be relatively stable, but customers will have to use more energy to keep warm than they did a year ago, according to the annual Winter Fuels Outlook from the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration.

Last winter was the warmest on record. This year temperatures are expected to be close to normal.

Heating bills will rise 20 percent for heating oil customers, 15 percent for natural gas customers, 13 percent for propane customers and 5 percent for electricity customers, the EIA announced Wednesday.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}winter energy{/biztweet}

 

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