Oregon looks to reduce greenhouse gas

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Thursday, October 04, 2012

Oregon's Energy Department released its first comprehensive cost analysis of ways to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

The most cost-effective steps involve getting cars off Oregon roads. Car-sharing, parking management, and walking and biking strategies all promise to save hundreds of dollars for every ton of carbon reduced.

Using forestry and big renewable energy projects to cut carbon tends to be the least cost-effective.

Read more at OPB.

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