NEEA launches efficient TV campaign

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Tuesday, October 02, 2012

The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance launched a campaign to help consumers shop for energy efficient televisions.

NEEA and its partners have been promoting efficient TVs since 2009. During that time television energy efficiency has improved by 60 percent.

"The Northwest Power and Conservation Council estimates some of the biggest energy savings over the next 20 years could come from more Northwest residents choosing super-efficient televisions," said Ty Stober, market transformation initiative lead at NEEA, in a press release.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

{biztweet}neea efficient tv{/biztweet}

 

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