Oregon dam in the spotlight

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Friday, September 21, 2012

Douglas County's Galesville Dam plays a starring role in an upcoming Hollywood film.

Douglas County commissioners signed a contract Wednesday with Tipping Point Productions giving the company permission to film "Night Moves" at the dam and reservoir.

Production is scheduled to take place in mid-October and is expected to take several days. The county will be paid $2,000 per day.

"They're going to blow up the dam, and there will be people scurrying up the hillside toward the road," Public Works Director Robb Paul said. "They'll also have some boats on the water."

Read more at The Roseburg News-Review.

{biztweet}night moves{/biztweet}

 

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