Home Must Reads U.S. builders start work on more homes in August

U.S. builders start work on more homes in August

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Must Reads
Wednesday, September 19, 2012

U.S. builders started work on more homes in August, more evidence of a recovering housing market.

The Commerce Department said Wednesday that construction of homes and apartments rose 2.3 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 750,000 last month. That’s up from 733,000 in July, which was revised lower from last month’s initial estimate.

Single-family housing starts rose 5.5 percent to an annual rate of 535,000 homes, the best pace since April 2010. Apartment construction, which can be volatile from month to month, fell 4.9 percent.

Read more at The Washington Post.

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