Eugene wants to ban plastic, paper bags

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Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Environmental activists want to ban paper as well as plastic bags in Eugene, to move residents away from the "single-use lifestyle."

“As environmentalists, our No. 1 goal is to get people to use reusable bags,” said Sarah Higginbotham of Environment Oregon, one of the groups seeking a bag ban in Eugene.

Higginbotham said the plastic bag ban, with the nickel-per-paper bag charge, is “a good starting point.” But the long-term goal, even after a statewide plastic bag ban, is to do away with paper bags.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

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