Grabhorn agrees to $7M cleanup plan

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Wednesday, September 05, 2012

The operator of the former Grabhorn landfill near Cooper Mountain has agreed to pay $7 million for a cleanup managed by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality.

Howard Grabhorn and Grabhorn Inc. agreed to give DEQ $2.5 million, plus $4.5 million provided by their insurer Maryland Casualty. DEQ would hire contractors to clean up contamination, which has been documented 45 feet below the ground and extending along roughly 1,400 feet of Tualatin River frontage.

If the proposed settlement is accepted by a Washington County judge, it would resolve longstanding litigation brought by the Northwest Environmental Defense Center and Friends of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge. It also would result in cleanup of the 37-acre construction waste site that closed in 2009.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

{biztweet}grabhorn cleanup{/biztweet}

 

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