Cooling coal emissions could help air quality

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Tuesday, August 28, 2012

A team of University of Oregon physicists found that cooling coal-fired power plants' emissions could drop the levels of dangerous chemicals in the air.

Also, a separate, unpublished economic analysis from UO researchers found that the cryogenic process would likely increase the cost of power and would require cooling machinery that can reach the size of a football stadium. But the equipment, according to Donnelly, isn't much more expensive than pollution control equipment now being used by power plants.

And those negatives would be further offset by a 38 percent drop in costs associated with health care and battling climate change.

Read more at Sustainable Business Oregon.

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