Mobile cannery helps microbreweries

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Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Portland entrepreneur starts mobile cannery to help microbreweries afford canning their beers.

Justin Brandt started Northwest Canning because he couldn't find enough local craft beers in cans.

Most microbreweries need the mobile cannery only about once a month. It saves them money and the beer makers say beer is better in a can rather than a bottle, because light coming into a bottle can compromise the flavor.

With a $80,000 investment and plenty of research, he hit the road and is now traveling the Northwest helping small breweries expand.

Read more at KGW.

{biztweet}mobile cannery{/biztweet}

 

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