Salem vetoes housing proposal

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Tuesday, August 28, 2012

The Salem City Council vetoed a decision to build apartments near the airport.

Councilors said the 88-unit apartment project’s proximity to the airport and businesses created too many problems. Noise from the airport as well as businesses, traffic conflicts, and the safety of children living in apartments surrounded by busy streets were among their concerns.

“If you look at the global impact, it appears to be an inappropriate use for so many reasons,” said Salem City Councilor Laura Tesler, who introduced the motion to reverse the hearings officer’s go ahead.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}salem housing{/biztweet}

 

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