Port electricians resume work

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Thursday, August 16, 2012

Longshoremen at the Port of Portland stood aside as union electricians resumed disputed work.

For now, the division of labor ends a crisis at the Port, where a dispute over which union gets to work with the containers disrupted operations this summer, leading to massive cargo tie-ups and skipped vessel calls.

But Port managers say longshoremen could still choose to defy a National Labor Relations Board decision Monday awarding electricians the equivalent of two jobs plugging, unplugging and monitoring refrigerated containers.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}portland longshoremen{/biztweet}

 

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