Electricians, not longshoremen, get Port jobs

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Tuesday, August 14, 2012

The National Labor Relations Board decided that union electricians, not longshoremen, are entitled to two jobs at the center of the recent dispute.

In a five-page ruling, the Washington, D.C.-based board rejected longshore arguments that members of their union were entitled to the work plugging, unplugging and monitoring refrigerated containers, called reefers. Problems related to the dispute led to mile-long lines of trucks at the Port this summer and caused container vessels to bypass Portland.

The NLRB decision is a big loss for the longshore union, which also faces a federal trial resuming Monday in Portland on accusations that a union representative made threats related to the dispute. Longshoremen who took over the reefer work this summer have continued doing it, while electricians have stood aside to keep the peace.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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