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UO running out of room

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Must Reads
Monday, August 13, 2012

The University of Oregon's student body has risen 25% in six years, but the college hasn't added classrooms to accommodate the growth.

Since the mid-2000s, developers have completed or are building about 1,000 more apartments near campus, with each apartment typically accommodating two to four students.

But the university, meanwhile, has fallen behind in classroom construction. The last major classroom-producing project was construction of the Knight Law Center in the late 1990s.

Now, the UO is at capacity, said former UO interim President Robert Berdahl, who on Aug. 1 handed the reins to incoming President Michael Gottfredson.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

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Guest
+2 #1 Efficient Use of CapitalGuest 2012-08-13 19:10:41
For the past 38 years I have been an adjunct faculty member at seven colleges and universities in Oregon and Washington. Believe me there is not a shortage of classrooms or labs at any of the junior colleges, colleges or universities in either state. The problenm is acheduling. Students want 9:00 to 2:00 classes two or three days per week. Faculty want 8:00 to 2:30 classes fours days per week. Visit any college or university classroom after 3:00 pm any day of the week, or any Friday and they will be empty. There is no reason to waste limited capital resources until the current classrooms are being utilized 14 hours per day six days per week.
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