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Eugene students appeal climate lawsuit

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Must Reads
Monday, August 13, 2012

Two young Eugene residents are appealing a judge's dismissal of their lawsuit alleging Oregon violates the public trust by not taking action on climate change.

Olivia Chernaik, 12; Kelsey Juliana, 16; and their mothers also have filed a motion asking the Oregon Court of Appeals to send the case directly to the Oregon Supreme Court.

The suit, one of almost 50 similar efforts nationwide, seeks to compel state officials to create and carry out “a viable plan for reducing carbon dioxide emissions,” according to Julia Olson, executive director of Our Children’s Trust, a Eugene-based nonprofit group that has helped organize the legal challenges.

Read more at The Register-Guard.

{biztweet}eugene climate{/biztweet}

 

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