Growers repeat opposition to canola

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Friday, August 10, 2012

Specialty seed growers repeated their opposition to growing canola in the Willamette Valley.

Specialty seed growers raise radish, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and other vegetables for seed, which are planted by farmers around the world. In a joint statement, the Willamette Valley Specialty Seed Association, the Specialty Seed Growers of Western Oregon, the Oregon Clover Commission, and the Oregon Seed Association explained their opposition to canola:

"There is no compelling reason to “balance the interests” in the Willamette Valley when those interests can be balanced by growing canola in other production areas of the state. In addition, the WVSSA would argue that past research at Oregon State University has already established that without government subsidy rapeseed is not an economic crop for the Willamette Valley. At the same time, the WVSSA supports the development of energy sources that are alternatives to fossil fuels, including biofuels derived from plants that can be grown in the Willamette Valley economically.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}canola{/biztweet}

 

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