Log exports to China drop

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Wednesday, August 08, 2012

China's slowing economy may benefit Oregon's lumber and plywood mills by making more timber available at reasonable prices.

China's red-hot economy meant its buyers were willing to pay higher prices for logs. That appears to be changing, said Tom Partin, president of the Portland-based American Forest Resource Council. The group represents lumber manufacturers and timber producers.

"What I've heard is they're trying to curb their inflation and slow down growth," Partin said. "They've over-built, hence they're not drawing so many logs from different places."

That's made more reasonably priced timber available for Northwest mills, he said. In addition, mills have been able to charge more for finished lumber and plywood because building has picked up in the past three months.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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