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Oregon wineries expect good vintage

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Wednesday, August 08, 2012

Despite recent triple digit temperatures, Oregon wineries expect a good vintage this year.

“It just literally sunburns the outside of the skins. Once the temperature reaches over 100, it can actually shut down the grape and stop it from maturing,” [Willamette Valley Vineyards assistant winemaker Daniel Shepherd] explained.

But luckily the hot spell didn't last long and most of the grapes escaped with no damage. Good news for Oregon wineries following two very challenging years.

Read more at KGW.

{biztweet}oregon wine{/biztweet}

 

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