Tillamook gets new CEO

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Tuesday, August 07, 2012

The Tillamook County Creamery Association Board of Directors named Patrick Criteser as new CEO.

Criteser spent the past eight years in the coffee industry, most recently as president and CEO of Coffee Bean International, a Portland-based coffee roaster.

While at the roaster, he grew sales more than 300 percent.

Read more at Capital Press.

{biztweet}tillamook ceo{/biztweet}

 

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