OSU has ties to Mars mission

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Monday, August 06, 2012

Oregon State University professor Jeff Barnes and research associate Dan Tyler have worked for four years to create the most accurate computer model of the Martian atmosphere.

In some respects, Barnes said, “Mars’ atmosphere is a lot like ours. There are lots of curve balls it can throw you in terms of how things can change in a short time.”

Barnes and Tyler made heavy use of the available data from previous missions to Mars to make the model as accurate as they possibly could. Then, “We let the model do its thing,” Barnes said, although he added “we are continually tweaking it, making small adjustments.”

Read more at The Register-Guard.

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