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Economic stability of Oregon families falls

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Must Reads
Thursday, August 02, 2012

The economic stability of Oregon families has fallen into the bottom 10 nationally.

In its new Kids Count Data Book, the Annie E. Casey Foundation calculates economic stability by using four measurements of government data. In all of them, Oregon's ranking worsened.

"Obviously in the economic downturn we've seen an increase in poverty," said Stacy Michaelson, policy associate for Children First of Oregon. Over the last year, the number of children living in poverty has jumped 11 percent, she said.

That translates to 184,000 Oregon children living in poverty, with 350,000 children whose parents don't have stable jobs.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}oregon family{/biztweet}

 

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