Ted Wheeler calls for PERS changes

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Friday, July 27, 2012

Oregon Treasurer Ted Wheeler endorsed changes to the state's Public Employees Retirement System.

Wheeler's office circulated a letter Thursday that he sent to the Board of the Oregon Public Employees Retirement System in late June. In it, Wheeler asked the board to immediately revisit and potentially lower the pension fund's aggressive assumption on investment returns, currently 8 percent.

He also suggested two reforms to the pension system: capping the annual cost of living increases granted to retirees and eliminating the practice of paying out-of-state retirees extra benefits to cover Oregon income taxes, which they don't pay.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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