Home Must Reads Nike removes Joe Paterno's name from childcare center

Nike removes Joe Paterno's name from childcare center

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Must Reads
Friday, July 13, 2012

Amid the Pennsylvania State University sex-abuse scandal, Nike decided to remove football coach Joe Paterno's name from its largest childcare center.

Thursday, the game changed. After the release of a report critical of both Penn State and Paterno for allegedly covering up for a child abuser rather than risk embarrassment to the football program, Nike said a name would be removed from one of the buildings on its sprawling headquarters campus near Beaverton for the first time.

It was rare move for a company that has shown great patience for the misbehaviors of its athletes over the years.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}paterno nike{/biztweet}

 

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