Oregon startup converts exhaust into electricity

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Hillsboro startup Regenergy365 makes devices that convert HVAC systems' exhaust into electricity.

“There aren’t any competing technologies, but we’ll be competing for the same energy efficiency dollars,” [founder and CEO Jeff] Gilbert said. “Others just save energy, though; we provide a choice for what to do with it.”

The patented Exhaust Capturing Electrical Regeneration Device (ECERD) is essentially a group of mini wind turbines that mount onto cooling towers, vents or fan decks. When the exhaust from a building’s HVAC system blows out, the device turns that by-product, which Gilbert calls “synthetic wind energy,” into electricity.

Read more at The Daily Journal of Commerce.

{biztweet}exhaust energy{/biztweet}

 

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