Oregon unemployment benefits rise

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Oregonians who file for unemployment insurance benefits on or after July 1 will receive slightly more in payments.

The maximum weekly benefit amount an individual can receive rose to $524, an increase of $20. The minimum weekly benefit amount rose to $122, an increase of $3, according to the Oregon Employment Department.

The uptick in benefit payments is the result of a state law that requires the department to recalculate the maximum and minimum amounts paid weekly to those filing for unemployment benefits.

Read more at The Statesman Journal.

{biztweet}oregon unemployment{/biztweet}

 

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