Home Must Reads Portland school board to go forward on bond measure

Portland school board to go forward on bond measure

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Must Reads
Tuesday, July 10, 2012

The Portland School Board voted to go forward with plans for a $482 million capital bond measure on the November ballot.

If approved, it will become the largest local government bond measure in Oregon history.

The bulk of the bond -- $278 million -- will go toward rebuilding Grant, Franklin and Roosevelt high schools, as well as Faubion K-8, chosen because of its partnership with its neighbor, Concordia University.

The district and board are hoping the smaller request -- $1.10 per $1,000 of assessed property value, or about $275 annually for a house valued at $250,000 -- will change the mind of voters who rejected a massive $548 million bond last year that would have rebuilt eight schools. This November’s 20-year bond will keep the $1.10 rate for eight years, then switch to a rate of 30 cent per $1,000 of assessed property value for an additional twelve years.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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Guest
0 #1 General Political ActivistGuest 2012-07-10 20:43:35
I am grateful to hear that this latest bond effort, has cross support from our leaders. Now, we shall truly see whether our voters and taxpayers go for it, because there is a lot of resignation, anger, and distrust, in our current system. I'm keeping my fingers crossed, of course, but I'm not holding my breath, either.
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