UO physicists help discover Higgs boson

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Monday, July 09, 2012

Several UO faculty and graduate students contributed to the discovery of the elusive Higgs boson.

"This is the missing piece to this puzzle we've had for a long time," said Jacob Searcy, a UO graduate student working on the project. "The idea of the Higgs boson was proposed in the 1960s before I was born, and it's come to fruition now."

UO's contributions were critical to the success of the project, ranging from determining if the detector is functioning correctly all the way to designing even more precise detectors for future experiments.

The president of the Institute of Physics called the Higgs boson's discovery "as significant to physics as the discovery of DNA was to biology."

Read more at OregonLive.com.

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