100-year-old Eugene company thrives during recession

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Monday, July 09, 2012

Commercial Dehydrator Systems of Eugene has been around since 1911 and is currently growing.

[President David] Stone attributes the company’s growth to old-­fashioned business values and speed in innovation and finding new markets for the company’s equipment, which preserves through dehydration fruits, vegetables, nuts and other products that would otherwise go to waste.

“Right now, we’re in an extremely advantageous mode,” he said. “We are absolutely snowed under with orders. We’re going to have to put on another shift. We’ve been hiring frantically for the last few months.”

Read more at The Register-Guard.

{biztweet}commercial dehydrator systems{/biztweet}

 

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