Home Must Reads Portland rents rise and vacancy falls

Portland rents rise and vacancy falls

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Friday, July 06, 2012

Apartments are getting harder to find in the Portland area as vacancy falls and rents rise.

The metro vacancy rate fell to 2.2 percent from April to June, according to preliminary numbers released Thursday by Reis Inc., a real estate data firm.

Portland remains the second-tightest apartment market in the country, with a vacancy rate only slightly higher than New York. In fact, Reis reports identical 2.2 percent vacancy rates but identifies New York as the tightest market in its accompanying analysis.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}portland{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Two sides of the coin

Contributed Blogs
Monday, August 25, 2014
0825 thumb moneyBY JASON NORRIS | OB GUEST BLOGGER

Ferguson Wellman’s investment views on the economy and capital markets.


Read more...

Report Card

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Strong public schools shore up the economy, survey respondents say. But local schools demonstrate lackluster performance.


Read more...

Powerlist: Law Firms

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

A conversation with leading partners at law firms in Portland and eastern Oregon, followed by October's powerlist.


Read more...

College Conundrum

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

University and college tuition fees have been rising for more than a decade, while state funds for higher education have steadily declined.


Read more...

Fast Food Slows Down

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

The ubiquitous fast-food restaurant may be on the decline.


Read more...

Launch

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

September's Launch article features Orchid Health, BuddyUp and Inter-Europe Consulting.


Read more...

The Rail Baron

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Oil is gushing out of the U.S. and Canada, and much of it is coming from places that don’t have pipeline infrastructure. So it’s being shipped by rail.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS