Tasteless tomato culprit found

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Friday, June 29, 2012

Plant geneticists have discovered the gene mutation that makes grocery store tomatoes so tasteless.

Yes, they are often picked green and shipped long distances. Often they are refrigerated, which destroys their flavor and texture. But now researchers have discovered a genetic reason that diminishes a tomato’s flavor even if the fruit is picked ripe and coddled.

The unexpected culprit is a gene mutation that occurred by chance and was discovered by tomato breeders. It was deliberately bred into almost all tomatoes because it conferred an advantage: It made them a uniform luscious scarlet when ripe.

Read more at The Bend Bulletin.

{biztweet}tasteless tomato{/biztweet}

 

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