Maxim plans $75M expansion in Beaverton

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Thursday, June 28, 2012

Maxim Integrated Products plans to spend $75 million to upgrade its semiconductor factory in Beaverton.

The Silicon Valley company bought the 226,000 square-foot facility from Tektronix in 1994. Maxim said it currently employs 540 there, plus another 300 at an administrative and engineering facility in Hillsboro.

Maxim’s makes mixed-signal and analog semiconductors, which don’t require the latest manufacturing technology, nor the multibillion-dollar investments that go along with keeping current.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}maxim beaverton{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Downtime with the director of Barley's Angels

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Live, Work, Play with Christine Jump.


Read more...

Green workplace 2.0

Linda Baker
Thursday, May 28, 2015
IMG 2808BY LINDA BAKER | EDITOR

Reinventing capitalism. Office dumpster divers. Handprints versus carbon footprints. These are some of the ideas panelists and attendees discussed during the second annual Oregon Business “Green Your Workplace” seminar yesterday.


Read more...

Efficiency Boost

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

How conservation stimulates the local economy.


Read more...

The Green Paradox

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY EMILY LIEDEL

Inside the topsy-turvy world of corporate sustainability rankings.


Read more...

6 development projects reshaping Bend

The Latest
Thursday, April 09, 2015
bendthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Bend has reclaimed its prerecession title as one of the fastest growing cities in the country.


Read more...

The best crisis is the one you avoid

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, April 15, 2015
crisisthumbBY GARY CONKLING | GUEST BLOGGER

Avoiding a crisis is a great way to burnish your reputation, increase brand loyalty and become a market leader.


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS