Salem school reuse helps district

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Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Salem-Keizer School District closed six elementary schools in the past year, so what happened to those buildings? And did the move save as much as the district promised?

Closing the first three schools, Bethel, Lake Labish and Fruitland, saved the district about $1 million per year, which is $400,000 more than projected, said Salem-Keizer Chief of Staff Mary Paulson.

The unused space at Fruitland then allowed the district to accept $330,000 in Oregon Head Start expansion funds. As a result, Salem-Keizer served 60 students who might not have attended preschool.

Read more in today's Statesman Journal.

 

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