Group protests logging plan

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Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Critics of increased logging on Oregon’s south coast took the Capitol by surprise Monday.

They climbed the flagpoles to hang banners, sang and danced inside the Capitol rotunda and occupied the offices of Secretary of State Kate Brown and state Treasurer Ted Wheeler for more than six hours.

The incident started at 11 a.m. when former Gov. Barbara Roberts, who happened to be leading a group of women on a tour of the Capitol, noticed three people at the base of the U.S. flagpole on the Capitol’s east side. She said it appeared one of them was going to climb it, and she had someone summon authorities.

 

Read more in today's Statesman Journal.

 

Comments   

 
Guest
+2 #1 RE: Group protests logging planGuest 2012-06-26 17:33:24
Why don't these people do something constructive? Logging is a sustainable resource. Trees can and ARE replanted after logging operations. Perhaps some FACTS need to be made public, rather than knee-jerk reactions and hype. Do these people live in the areas to be logged? Are their daily lives impacted by the lack of jobs, income, federal funding paid on lands that are not privately owned? Lands that are federally owned do not pay property taxes - guess where funding for schools come from? Property taxes folks. Thought process here - why might schools be underfunded, well since the spotted owl stopped logging funding has greatly diminished. Since more research has shown that there are many other influences on the spotted owl habitat than logging an intelligent person would conclude that logging could resume. The fact that replanted logging areas provide much more food sources for wildlife should also be considered, along with the fact that it's healthy for forests, better for wildfire control, along with jobs and income. Frankly, if you don't live, work in the area to be considered for logging you shouldn't be able to impact the decision. Get a job protesters, contribute to society rather than be a leech.
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Guest
+1 #2 Logging and lifeGuest 2012-06-27 14:41:11
Why don't these protesters get a job or at least a life. I would be willing to bet they all live in homes made of wood.
Wonder where that wood came from ?
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