American drivers turning to smaller engines

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Friday, June 15, 2012

Americans are increasingly buying cars with smaller engines that use less fuel.

More than half the new cars and trucks sold in the United States through May had four-cylinder motors. That’s up from 36 percent in 2007, and it’s the highest sales percentage since 1998, when the J.D. Power and Associates consulting firm started keeping track.

Because of technology advances, many four-cylinder engines are more powerful than V-6s from only a few years ago. For example, today’s Hyundai Sonata midsize car has a 2.4-liter four with 198 horsepower, 45 more horses than the base V-6 in a 2006 Ford Taurus.

Read more at The Register Guard.

{biztweet}small engine{/biztweet}

 

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