Japanese dock floats Coast tourism

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Must Reads
Thursday, June 14, 2012

Thousands of people are flocking to see a Japanese dock that was torn loose by last year's tsunami and ended up on an Oregon beach. But it won't stay a tourist attraction for long.

Some local residents and callers to the Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation are suggesting that state officials leave the 165-ton, 66-foot-long dock as a memorial.

Chris Havel, a state parks spokesman, said the state is obligated to protect the integrity of the beach, which means keeping it clean.

Read more at CBSNEWS.com.

 

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