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Solar prices will rise due to tariffs

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Newly-imposed tariffs could cut Chinese solar panel shipments by 45%, raising prices in the U.S.

IHS iSuppli said in a report released Tuesday that the cost of installing a solar system could jump from $2.56 a watt to $2.65 a watt, as mainland Chinese companies circumvent the tariffs by buying solar cells from Taiwan, adding costs.

This will allow the Chinese players to avoid the high tariffs ranging from 34 to 250 percent," said Mike Sheppard, an IHS photovoltaics analyst quoted in a news release. "However, such a strategy also will add 10 to 12 percent additional cost for the modules."

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}solar{/biztweet}

 

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