CEO pay hits record high

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Friday, May 25, 2012

CEOs at typical public companies made $9.6 million in 2011, a record high.

That was up more than 6 percent from the previous year, and is the second year in a row of increases. The figure is also the highest since the AP began tracking executive compensation in 2006.

Companies trimmed cash bonuses but handed out more in stock awards. For shareholder activists who have long decried CEO pay as exorbitant, that was a victory of sorts.


Read more at OregonLive.com.

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