Advocates work toward home birth reform

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Health safety advocates are working with the Oregon Health Licensing Agency toward reform for home births.

Oregon’s unique rules regarding out-of-hospital delivery have come under the spotlight following high-profile court cases involving infant death and permanent crippling.

Unlicensed midwives take charge in about 18-25 percent of home births, which account for about 3 percent of the nearly 50,000 births in Oregon annually. But that number is on the rise. Oregon is also the only place other than Utah allowing unlicensed midwives. “This problem will be getting worse and not better if we don’t work together,” said Melissa Cheyney, chair of the Board of Direct Entry Midwifery, which makes recommendations to the Oregon Health Licensing Agency.

Read more at The Lund Report.

{biztweet}oregon midwife{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

European Vacation

Guest Blog
Thursday, April 23, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

There are winners and losers with a strengthening U.S. dollar.


Read more...

Letting Go

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

As baby boomers sell their businesses, too many forget the all-important succession plan.


Read more...

An uncertain future

Guest Blog
Thursday, May 21, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

Uncertainty is a part of doing business, whether in through the lens of investment opportunities and risks or the business of running an enterprise.


Read more...

6 highlights from the Craft Brewers Conference

The Latest
Friday, April 17, 2015
thumbcbcPHOTOS BY  JASON E. KAPLAN

The 32nd annual CBC attracted a record number of attendees (11,000)  to the Oregon Convention Center.


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

The ancient fish that stops bullets

The Latest
Friday, May 08, 2015
hagfishthumbBY CHRIS NOBLE | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Hagfish may not have evolved much over the last 300 million years, but their protein-heavy slime promises advances in super-materials.


Read more...

Courtside

April 2015
Thursday, March 26, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Power lunching at the Court Street Dairy Lunch in Salem.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS