Vanport International tailors lumber to Japanese market

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Monday, May 21, 2012

Vanport International is one of the few Northwest companies that has mastered milling lumber to Japan's exacting metric specifications.

Destruction from last year's tsunami means more than 300,000 houses need to be repaired or replaced.

The company, guided by its soft-spoken chairman, German native Adolf Hertrich, has cultivated extraordinary ties in a nation that has often frustrated conventional U.S. exporters. These links helped the Boring-based company survive more than one near-fatal predicament. As competing mills tanked, Vanport morphed to build on its Japan business and forge new cross-cultural ties, most recently rescuing the mill at the Warm Springs Indian Reservation outside Madras.

They aim for quality instead of quantity. They cut the best part of each log for Japan, sending the rest to China, Taiwan or the domestic market. And they pay particular attention to the appearance of beams, which are often left exposed in Japanese homes.

Read more at OregonLive.com.

{biztweet}japan lumber{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

Reader Input: School Choice

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015

Which of the following would be most effective in reducing the cost of operating a public university in Oregon?


Read more...

Baby. Boom!

September 2015
Wednesday, August 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

A new co-working model disrupts office sharing, child care and work-life balance as we know it.


Read more...

Light Reading

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Ask any college student: Textbook prices have skyrocketed out of control. Online education startup Lumen Learning aims to bring them down to earth.


Read more...

Best Foot Forward

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Whether you're stepping out to work or onto the track, Pacific Northwest shoe companies have you covered.


Read more...

Store Bought

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Market of Choice is on a tear. In 2012 the 35-year-old Eugene-based grocery chain opened a central kitchen/distribution center in its hometown. The market opened a third Portland store in the Cedar Mill neighborhood this year; a Bend outpost broke ground in March. A fourth Portland location is slated for the inner southeast “LOCA” development, a mixed-use project featuring condos and retail. Revenues in 2014 were $175 million, a double-digit increase over 2013. CEO Rick Wright discusses growth, market trends and how he keeps new “foodie” grocery clerks happy.


Read more...

Department of Self-Promotion

Linda Baker
Tuesday, August 04, 2015

061715-awards1Oregon Business wins journalism awards.


Read more...

Downtime with Jill Nelson

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Live, Work, Play wit the CEO of Ruby Receptionists.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS