Apple data centers go green

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Friday, May 18, 2012

None of Apple's three data centers, including the one being built in Prineville, will use power produced by coal.

“We are leading the industry,” [Chief Financial Officer Peter Oppenheimer] said. “All three of our data centers will be coal free, which is an industry first for anybody of our size.”

Greenpeace in a report last month singled out Apple, Amazon.com Inc. and Twitter Inc. for not using enough clean energy. The report gave better grades to Google Inc., Yahoo! Inc. and Facebook Inc. -- all companies that have facilities powered in part by renewable sources such as water and wind, according to Greenpeace.

Oppenheimer declined to say whether the changes were a response to the Greenpeace report or protests. He stressed that Apple’s plans have been in place since last year.

Read more at Bloomberg.

{biztweet}apple data center{/biztweet}

 

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