Report tracks costs of Oregon's obesity epidemic

| Print |  Email
Must Reads
Thursday, May 17, 2012

A new report looks at the medical costs associated with 60% of Oregon adults being overweight or obese.

Between 1990 and 2009 obesity rates in Oregon increased a drastic 121 percent, with over 1.76 million Oregon adults classified as obese or overweight in 2009, based on a report released yesterday by the Oregon Health Authority's Public Health Division.

The increasing obesity rates have also forced a jump in the cost of health care, according to the report. Oregon medical costs related to adult obesity reached $1.6 billion in 2006, $339 million of the which was paid by Medicare, and $333 million by Medicaid.

Read more at The Portland Tribune.

{biztweet}oregon obese{/biztweet}

 

More Articles

An uncertain future

Guest Blog
Thursday, May 21, 2015
norristhumbBY JASON NORRIS | GUEST BLOGGER

Uncertainty is a part of doing business, whether in through the lens of investment opportunities and risks or the business of running an enterprise.


Read more...

Downtime with the director of Barley's Angels

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Live, Work, Play with Christine Jump.


Read more...

Knight Cancer Challenge No Biotech Dream

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

The Knight challenge is an important instance of philanthropy. But we should not assume it will magically transform OHSU into a business- and job-spinning engine for the local economy.


Read more...

The ancient fish that stops bullets

The Latest
Friday, May 08, 2015
hagfishthumbBY CHRIS NOBLE | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Hagfish may not have evolved much over the last 300 million years, but their protein-heavy slime promises advances in super-materials.


Read more...

Power Players

April 2015
Friday, March 27, 2015
BY ROBERT MULLIN

A new energy-sharing agreement sparks concerns about independence and collaboration in the region's utility industry.


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

6 development projects reshaping Bend

The Latest
Thursday, April 09, 2015
bendthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Bend has reclaimed its prerecession title as one of the fastest growing cities in the country.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS